revised teaching statement (finished a draft)
authorBenjamin Mako Hill <mako@atdot.cc>
Mon, 3 Sep 2012 18:54:50 +0000 (14:54 -0400)
committerBenjamin Mako Hill <mako@atdot.cc>
Mon, 3 Sep 2012 18:55:27 +0000 (14:55 -0400)
Makefile
teaching_statement.tex

index b219b72..d4bbda0 100644 (file)
--- a/Makefile
+++ b/Makefile
@@ -4,16 +4,12 @@ all: $(patsubst %.tex,%.pdf,$(wildcard *.tex))
 pdf: all
 
 %.pdf: %.tex
-       perl -p -e 's/©//' refs.bib > refs-cleaned.bib
-       recode -d u8..ltex < refs-cleaned.bib > refs-processed.bib
        rubber -fd $<
 
 clean: 
        rubber -d --clean *.tex
        rm -f *.tmp
        rm -f vc
-       rm -f refs-cleaned.bib
-       rm -f refs-processed.bib
 
 viewpdf: all
        evince *.pdf
index cb41961..b049696 100644 (file)
 
 \maketitle
 
-When I was eighteen and frusterated with high school, I took extra
-classes, graduated early, and moved to Ethiopia. A year later, I
-matriculated at Hampshire College: an experimental institution without
-grades, tests, or majors. I chose Hampshire becase I cared deeply
-about a personal connection to learning that I felt more traditional
-institutions would not afford.
-
-Today, I am passioante about teaching and I take pride in teaching
-well. However, as someone once driven away from traditional higher
-education, I also have a healthy ambivalence about my role at the
-front of the lecture hall and seminar table and strong feelings about
-how to help students learn.  Before each lecture, I reflect on the
-total human-hours my teaching consumes. In every class meeting, my
-students give me dozens, even hundreds, of hours of their attention. I
-strive to never waste it.
-
-I have noted that graduating PhD students have spent most of their
-lives in apprentice-like relationships. From their first day of grade
-school to their dissertation defense, students learn eveything from
-reading and arithmetic to sociological theory and multi-level
-statistical modeling from teachers who have and use that knowledge
-themselves.  ``I know something that I find useful,'' a teacher might
-say, ``and I want my student to be like me.''
+Graduating PhD students have spent most of their lives in
+apprenticeship relationships. From their first day of grade school to
+their dissertation defense, students learn everything from reading and
+arithmetic to sociological theory and multi-level statistical modeling
+from teachers who use that knowledge themselves.  ``I know something
+that I find useful,'' a teacher might say, ``and I want my student to
+be like me.''
 
 In much of higher education -- and in graduate and professional
-teaching in particular -- this relationship breaks down for the first
-time in most students' and teachers' lives. In business schools, where
-I teach most often, lectures are given by professors trained as
-academic sociologists, economists, and psychologists.  To say that few
-business school students have an interest in becoming social
-scientists would be understatement. I have seen how a failure to
-recognize this dynamic can lead to a lack of respect and a lack of
-connection between teachers and students seen as, ``the folks who pay
-the bills.''
-
-But this setting has also shown me that teaching that confronts, and
-takes advantage of, this dynamic can lead to transformative learning
-experiences. Successful teaching across intellectual domains goes
-beyond the simple reproduction of skills and knowledge and becomes a
-process of adapation and instantiation of knowledge in the context of
+teaching in particular -- this relationship breaks down. In business
+schools, where I teach most often, lectures are given by professors
+trained as academic sociologists, economists, and psychologists. Very
+few MBAs become social scientists. I have seen how a failure to
+recognize this dynamic can lead to a lack of respect and connection
+between teachers and students treated as, ``the folks who pay the
+bills.''
+
+Business school has also shown me that teaching that overcomes this
+dynamic can lead to transformative learning. Teaching across
+intellectual domains goes beyond the reproduction of skills and
+knowledge and becomes the creation of new knowledge in the context of
 students' personal experiences. I understand that most of my students
-do not want to be a researcher like me. I believe that in spite of
-this unusual and challenging relationship, and \emph{because of it}, I
-can teach students in ways that suprise, connect, and enrich.
+will not become a researcher like me. I believe that in spite of this
+challenging relationship, and because of it, I can teach students in
+ways that surprise, connect, and enrich. In my teaching, I address
+this dynamic in three different ways.
+
+First, I strive to make my teaching material relevant to my students
+experiences and interests. I always seek to communicate why the
+material I teach is relevant and how it will be useful. I have taught
+identical material to engineers, MBAs, and executives and have worked
+to refine and tailor my message for each audience.
+
+Second, I attempt to involve students directly in learning. Even in
+large lectures, I engage students interactively in discussion of
+examples from their experience and adapt my teaching to emphasize
+relevant material. In assignments, I challenge students to integrate
+course concepts with their experience and interests.
+
+Third, and most importantly, I structure my teaching around an
+explicit mutual respect. Before each lecture, I reflect on the total
+student-hours my teaching will consume. I realize that in every class
+meeting, my students give me dozens, even hundreds, of hours of their
+attention. I strive to never waste it. I continually seek feedback
+from my students so that my teaching is more relevant, useful, and
+important to them.
 
 \section{Teaching Experience}
 
@@ -115,34 +117,31 @@ Over the last three years, I have served as the teaching assistant for
 Professor Eric von Hippel's lecture courses on innovation where I have
 worked closely with students on the design and evaluation of their
 course projects. In these classes, I have developed, delivered, and
-refined a series of 90 minutes lectures as a guest lecturer in those
-classes. In particular, I have developed a lecture on Internet-based
-user innovation communities based around the case of consumer
-``hacking'' of Canon cameras and a practical lecture on how to attract
-participants to online communities.
-
-After positive evaluations from students in these course, I have been
-invited to give regular lectures in MIT's Executive Education and
-Visiting MBA programs. These lectures have focused on fundemental
-introduction to concepts on innovation management and user communities
-and on practical methods for putting these into action including lead
-user methods, broadcast search, and the construction of user
-communities.
-
-In addition to experience in the lecture hall, I have also run a
-series of seminars for smaller groups of graduate students. Working
-with Tom Malone at the Center for Collective Intelligence, I
-coordinated an interdisciplinary seminar on collective
-intelligence. Working with Chris Csikszentmihályi, I organized and ran
-a graduate seminar on Free, Libre and Open Source
-Software.
-
-Outside of organizing my own seminars, I have taught in a number of
-seminars at MIT Sloan, the MIT Media Lab, the MIT Program on
+refined a series of ninety-minute lectures as a guest lecturer. These
+include a lecture on online innovation communities using the case of
+consumer ``hacking'' of Canon cameras and a practical lecture on how
+to attract participants to online communities.
+
+After positive evaluations from students, I have been invited to give
+regular lectures in MIT's Executive Education and Visiting MBA
+programs. These lectures have focused on introducting concepts on
+management of innovation and user communities and on practical methods
+for putting these into action including lead user methods, broadcast
+search, and the construction of user communities.
+
+In addition to experience lecturing, I have also run a series of
+seminars for smaller groups of graduate students. Working with Tom
+Malone at the Center for Collective Intelligence, I coordinated an
+interdisciplinary seminar on collective intelligence. Working with
+Chris Csikszentmihályi, I organized and ran a graduate seminar on
+Free, Libre and Open Source Software.
+
+Outside of organizing my own seminars, I have guest-taught in a number
+of seminars at MIT Sloan, the MIT Media Lab, the MIT Program on
 Comparative Media Studies, Harvard Law School, the Stanford Design
 School, and elsewhere. Since 2011, I have also coordinated a reading
 group on empirical research into online cooperation at the Berkman
-Center for Intenet and Society at Harvard.
+Center for Internet and Society at Harvard.
 
 \section{Mentoring}
 
@@ -152,15 +151,15 @@ researchers. I have had the pleasure of mentoring several
 undergraduates at MIT through the Undergraduate Research Opportunities
 Program. These students worked with me on both a full-time basis over
 the summer and in a part-time capacity over the academic year giving
-me experience with day-to-day management and more hands-off
+me experience both in day-to-day management and more hands-off
 relationships.
 
 Additionally, I have served as an external advisor to two Masters
-degree students. I advised and evaluated one Masters Thesis on
-technology design and in am currently advising a Masters thesis
-studying a large free software community. In both cases, I have
-enjoyed meeting regularly and engaging with students over the life of
-their research projects.
+degree students. I advised and evaluated one thesis on technology
+design and in am currently advising a social scientific analysis of a
+large free software community. In both cases, I have enjoyed meeting
+regularly and engaging with students over the course of their research
+projects.
 
 \section{Example Courses}
 
@@ -172,13 +171,13 @@ Undergraduate ---
   traditional firm-based innovation as well innovation by hackers,
   user communities, free and open source software, and lead users.
 \item \emph{Quantitative Research Methods}: An introductory class on
-  applied statistics. Topics include basic stastical methods up to,
-  and including, linear regression with programming excercises using
+  applied statistics. Topics include basic statistical methods up to,
+  and including, linear regression with programming exercises using
   real data.
 \item \emph{Computer Mediated Communication}: An overview of practical
   and theoretical issues related to computer-mediated
-  communication. The class focuses on analyses of pratice but also
-  incorporate readings and lectures on system implementation and
+  communication. The class focuses on analyses of practice but also
+  incorporates readings and lectures on system implementation and
   design.
 \end{enumerate*}
 
@@ -193,9 +192,9 @@ Graduate ---
   unstructured text, and programming for massively parallel computing
   systems.
 \item \emph{Social Computing}: The theory, analysis, and design of
-  large scale, computer mediated social systems. Final projects will
+  large scale, computer-mediated social systems. Final projects will
   challenge students to create a new systems or execute a study of an
-  existing system.
+  existing community.
 \end{enumerate*}
 
 

Benjamin Mako Hill || Want to submit a patch?