revised teaching statement (finished a draft)
[bmh-teaching_statement] / teaching_statement.tex
1 \documentclass[10pt]{memoir}
2
3 % based on kieran healy's memoir modifications
4 \usepackage{mako-mem}
5 \chapterstyle{article-3}
6 \pagestyle{memo}
7
8 \usepackage{ucs}
9 \usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}
10
11 \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
12 \usepackage{textcomp}
13 \usepackage[garamond]{mathdesign}
14
15 \usepackage[letterpaper,left=1.2in,right=1.2in,top=1.2in,bottom=1.2in]{geometry}
16
17 % packages i use in essentially every document
18 \usepackage{graphicx}
19 \usepackage{enumerate}
20
21 % packages i use in many documents but leave off by default
22 % \usepackage{amsmath, amsthm, amssymb}
23 % \usepackage{dcolumn}
24 % \usepackage{endfloat}
25
26 % import and customize urls
27 \usepackage[usenames,dvipsnames]{color}
28 \usepackage[breaklinks]{hyperref}
29
30 \hypersetup{colorlinks=true, linkcolor=Black, citecolor=Black, filecolor=Blue,
31     urlcolor=Blue, unicode=true}
32
33 % add bibliographic stuff 
34 \usepackage[round]{natbib}
35 \def\citepos#1{\citeauthor{#1}'s (\citeyear{#1})}
36 \def\citespos#1{\citeauthor{#1}' (\citeyear{#1})}
37
38 % import vc stuff after running `make vc`: \input{vc} \pagestyle{kjhgit}
39
40 \newenvironment{enumerate*}%
41   {\begin{enumerate}%
42     \setlength{\itemsep}{0pt}%
43     \setlength{\parskip}{0pt}}%
44   {\end{enumerate}}
45
46 \begin{document}
47
48 \setlength{\parskip}{4.5pt}
49
50 \baselineskip 14.5pt
51
52 \title{Teaching Statement}
53 \author{Benjamin Mako Hill}
54 \date{}
55
56 % \published{\textsc{\textcolor{BrickRed}{This document is an
57 % unpublished draft.\\ Please do not distribute or cite without
58 % permission.}}}
59
60 \maketitle
61
62 Graduating PhD students have spent most of their lives in
63 apprenticeship relationships. From their first day of grade school to
64 their dissertation defense, students learn everything from reading and
65 arithmetic to sociological theory and multi-level statistical modeling
66 from teachers who use that knowledge themselves.  ``I know something
67 that I find useful,'' a teacher might say, ``and I want my student to
68 be like me.''
69
70 In much of higher education -- and in graduate and professional
71 teaching in particular -- this relationship breaks down. In business
72 schools, where I teach most often, lectures are given by professors
73 trained as academic sociologists, economists, and psychologists. Very
74 few MBAs become social scientists. I have seen how a failure to
75 recognize this dynamic can lead to a lack of respect and connection
76 between teachers and students treated as, ``the folks who pay the
77 bills.''
78
79 Business school has also shown me that teaching that overcomes this
80 dynamic can lead to transformative learning. Teaching across
81 intellectual domains goes beyond the reproduction of skills and
82 knowledge and becomes the creation of new knowledge in the context of
83 students' personal experiences. I understand that most of my students
84 will not become a researcher like me. I believe that in spite of this
85 challenging relationship, and because of it, I can teach students in
86 ways that surprise, connect, and enrich. In my teaching, I address
87 this dynamic in three different ways.
88
89 First, I strive to make my teaching material relevant to my students
90 experiences and interests. I always seek to communicate why the
91 material I teach is relevant and how it will be useful. I have taught
92 identical material to engineers, MBAs, and executives and have worked
93 to refine and tailor my message for each audience.
94
95 Second, I attempt to involve students directly in learning. Even in
96 large lectures, I engage students interactively in discussion of
97 examples from their experience and adapt my teaching to emphasize
98 relevant material. In assignments, I challenge students to integrate
99 course concepts with their experience and interests.
100
101 Third, and most importantly, I structure my teaching around an
102 explicit mutual respect. Before each lecture, I reflect on the total
103 student-hours my teaching will consume. I realize that in every class
104 meeting, my students give me dozens, even hundreds, of hours of their
105 attention. I strive to never waste it. I continually seek feedback
106 from my students so that my teaching is more relevant, useful, and
107 important to them.
108
109 \section{Teaching Experience}
110
111 Over the course of graduate school, I have learned to teach from my
112 mentors and have put this philosophy into practice in lectures and
113 seminars to MBAs, engineers, executives, undergraduates, and Masters
114 of Science students.
115
116 Over the last three years, I have served as the teaching assistant for
117 Professor Eric von Hippel's lecture courses on innovation where I have
118 worked closely with students on the design and evaluation of their
119 course projects. In these classes, I have developed, delivered, and
120 refined a series of ninety-minute lectures as a guest lecturer. These
121 include a lecture on online innovation communities using the case of
122 consumer ``hacking'' of Canon cameras and a practical lecture on how
123 to attract participants to online communities.
124
125 After positive evaluations from students, I have been invited to give
126 regular lectures in MIT's Executive Education and Visiting MBA
127 programs. These lectures have focused on introducting concepts on
128 management of innovation and user communities and on practical methods
129 for putting these into action including lead user methods, broadcast
130 search, and the construction of user communities.
131
132 In addition to experience lecturing, I have also run a series of
133 seminars for smaller groups of graduate students. Working with Tom
134 Malone at the Center for Collective Intelligence, I coordinated an
135 interdisciplinary seminar on collective intelligence. Working with
136 Chris Csikszentmih├ílyi, I organized and ran a graduate seminar on
137 Free, Libre and Open Source Software.
138
139 Outside of organizing my own seminars, I have guest-taught in a number
140 of seminars at MIT Sloan, the MIT Media Lab, the MIT Program on
141 Comparative Media Studies, Harvard Law School, the Stanford Design
142 School, and elsewhere. Since 2011, I have also coordinated a reading
143 group on empirical research into online cooperation at the Berkman
144 Center for Internet and Society at Harvard.
145
146 \section{Mentoring}
147
148 Of course, not all of teaching is unlike apprenticeship and I have
149 also enjoyed my experience as a mentor to developing scholars and
150 researchers. I have had the pleasure of mentoring several
151 undergraduates at MIT through the Undergraduate Research Opportunities
152 Program. These students worked with me on both a full-time basis over
153 the summer and in a part-time capacity over the academic year giving
154 me experience both in day-to-day management and more hands-off
155 relationships.
156
157 Additionally, I have served as an external advisor to two Masters
158 degree students. I advised and evaluated one thesis on technology
159 design and in am currently advising a social scientific analysis of a
160 large free software community. In both cases, I have enjoyed meeting
161 regularly and engaging with students over the course of their research
162 projects.
163
164 \section{Example Courses}
165
166 Undergraduate ---
167
168 \begin{enumerate*}
169 \item \emph{Innovation in the Internet Age}: An introduction to the
170   theory and practice of innovation management. Topics include
171   traditional firm-based innovation as well innovation by hackers,
172   user communities, free and open source software, and lead users.
173 \item \emph{Quantitative Research Methods}: An introductory class on
174   applied statistics. Topics include basic statistical methods up to,
175   and including, linear regression with programming exercises using
176   real data.
177 \item \emph{Computer Mediated Communication}: An overview of practical
178   and theoretical issues related to computer-mediated
179   communication. The class focuses on analyses of practice but also
180   incorporates readings and lectures on system implementation and
181   design.
182 \end{enumerate*}
183
184 Graduate ---
185 \begin{enumerate*}
186 \item \emph{Topics in Peer Production}: Seminar on foundational work
187   as well as recent advances in the study and support of free and open
188   source software, wikis, and remixing communities.
189 \item \emph{Research Methods for ``Big Data''}: An introduction to
190   statistical methods and tools for finding and manipulating very
191   large datasets. Topics include network analysis, analysis of
192   unstructured text, and programming for massively parallel computing
193   systems.
194 \item \emph{Social Computing}: The theory, analysis, and design of
195   large scale, computer-mediated social systems. Final projects will
196   challenge students to create a new systems or execute a study of an
197   existing community.
198 \end{enumerate*}
199
200
201
202 \end{document}
203

Benjamin Mako Hill || Want to submit a patch?