Add another, more complicated plotting example.
authorarokem <arokem@gmail.com>
Thu, 7 May 2015 23:07:18 +0000 (16:07 -0700)
committerAriel Rokem <arokem@gmail.com>
Thu, 7 May 2015 23:07:18 +0000 (16:07 -0700)
001-hello-plot.py
002-subplots.py [new file with mode: 0644]

index ef749ff..227b56c 100644 (file)
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ A first plot with matplotlib
 """
 
 import matplotlib.pyplot as plt 
-figure = plt.figure()
-axis = figure.add_subplot(111)
+figure, axis = plt.subplots(1)
 plt.plot([1,2,3], [1,2,3])
 plt.show()
+
diff --git a/002-subplots.py b/002-subplots.py
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..0c6749b
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,36 @@
+""" 
+
+Make a slightly more elaborate plot with subplots
+
+Save the figure in the end
+
+""" 
+import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
+import math
+
+# Make some data to plot
+x = []
+y1 = []
+y2 = []
+
+for i in range(100):
+    x.append(i)
+    y1.append(math.sin(i * (2 * math.pi / 100)))
+    y2.append(math.cos(i * (2 * math.pi/ 100)))
+
+# First, create an empty figure with 2 subplots
+# - The function plt.subplots returns an object for the figure and for each axes
+# - There are multiple ways to accomplish this same goal, but this is probably the
+#   simplest - notice that each subplot is associated with one of the axes objects.
+fig, (ax1, ax2) = plt.subplots(2)
+
+# Next, put one line on the first axis and both lines on the second axis
+# - On the second axes, add a legend to distinguish the two lines
+ax1.plot(x, y1)
+
+ax2.plot(x, y1, label='sin')  # The labels are what appear in the legend
+ax2.plot(x, y2, label='cos')
+ax2.legend()
+
+# Finally, save the figure as a png file
+fig.savefig('myfig.png')
\ No newline at end of file

Benjamin Mako Hill || Want to submit a patch?