committed version from plane (should be good to go)
[state_of_wikimedia_research_2013] / outline.org
1 * DONE Wikipedia in Context
2 ** DONE Reagle and Loveland on "Wikipedia and encyclopedic production"
3 * How Wikipedia is Organized
4 ** Butler et al:  Eyes on the prize: officially sanctioned rule breaking in mass collaboration systems
5 * Motivating Editors
6 ** Haiyi on Effects of Peer Feedback on Contribution: A Field Experiment in Wikipedia
7
8 One of the most significant challenges for many online communities is
9 increasing members' contributions over time. Prior studies on peer
10 feedback in online communities have suggested its impact on
11 contribution, but have been limited by their correlational nature. In
12 this paper, we conducted a field experiment on Wikipedia to test the
13 effects of different feedback types (positive feedback, negative
14 feedback, directive feedback, and social feedback) on members'
15 contribution. Our results characterize the effects of different
16 feedback types, and suggest trade-offs in the effects of feedback
17 between the focal task and general motivation, as well as differences
18 in how newcomers and experienced editors respond to peer
19 feedback. This research provides insights into the mechanisms
20 underlying peer feedback in online communities and practical guidance
21 to design more effective peer feedback systems.
22
23 * DONE Tool Development for Wikipedia
24 ** DONE A Case Study of Sockpuppet Detection in Wikipedia
25 * DONE Wikipedia as Data Source
26 ** DONE Dbnary: Wiktionary as a LMF based Multilingual RDF network
27 * DONE Evaluating Wikipedia's Quality
28 ** DONE Quality of Internet information in pediatric otolaryngology: A comparison of three most referenced websites
29 ** Presence and adequacy of pharmaceutical preparations in the Spanish edition of Wikipedia
30 * DONE Judging Quality of Wikipedia
31 ** DONE Your process is showing: controversy management and perceived quality in wikipedia
32
33 Nikki et al. 
34
35 ** Understanding trust formation in digital information sources: The case of Wikipedia
36
37 An article[5] in the Journal of Information Science, titled
38 "Understanding trust formation in digital information sources: The
39 case of Wikipedia", explores the criteria used by students to evaluate
40 the credibility of Wikipedia articles. It contains an overview of
41 various earlier studies about credibility judgments of Wikipedia
42 articles (some of them reviewed previously in this space, example:
43 "Quality of featured articles doesn't always impress readers").
44
45 The authors asked "20 second-year undergraduate students and 30
46 Master’s students" in information studies to first spend 20 minutes
47 reading "a copy of a two-page Wikipedia article on Generation Z, a
48 topic with which students were expected to have some familiarity", and
49 answer an open-ended question explaining how they would judge its
50 trustworthiness. In a subsequent part, the respondents were asked to
51 rank a list of factors for trustworthiness in case of "either (a) the
52 topic of an assignment, or (b) a minor medical condition from which
53 they were suffering". One of the first findings was a "low
54 pre-disposition to use [Wikipedia], possibly suggesting a propensity
55 to distrust, grounded on debates and comments on the trustworthiness
56 of Wikipedia" – possibly to the fact that the example article
57 contained an example of vandalism, a fact highlighted by several
58 respondents (e.g. "started off as a valid entry ... due to citations
59 strengthening this ... however came to the last paragraph and the
60 whole document was marred by the insert of 'writing articles on
61 Wikipedia while on amphetamines' [as purported hobby of Generation Z
62 members]... just feels that you can't trust anything now").
63
64 Among the given trustworthiness factors, the following were ranked
65 most highly:
66
67   authorship, currency, references, expert recommendation and
68   triangulation/verification, with usefulness just below this
69   threshold.
70
71 In other words, participants valued having articles that were written
72 by experts on the subject, that were up to date, and that they
73 perceived to be useful (content factors). ... Interestingly these
74 factors all seemed more or less equally important for both contexts,
75 with the exception of references, which for predictable reasons were
76 seen as having greater importance in the context of assignments.
77
78 * Viewership
79 ** "Science eight times more popular on the Spanish Wikipedia than on the English Wikipedia"
80 * Not Presenting
81 ** Ayelet Oz Paper

Benjamin Mako Hill || Want to submit a patch?