add authorship information
[bmh-research_statement] / research_statement.tex
1 \documentclass[10pt]{memoir}
2
3 % based on kieran healy's memoir modifications
4 \usepackage{mako-mem}
5 \chapterstyle{article-3}
6 \pagestyle{memo}
7
8 \usepackage{ucs}
9 \usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}
10
11 \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
12 \usepackage{textcomp}
13 \usepackage[garamond]{mathdesign}
14
15 \usepackage[letterpaper,left=1.2in,right=1.2in,top=1.2in,bottom=1.2in]{geometry}
16
17 % packages i use in essentially every document
18 \usepackage{graphicx}
19 \usepackage{wrapfig}
20 \usepackage{enumerate}
21
22 % packages i use in many documents but leave off by default
23 % \usepackage{amsmath, amsthm, amssymb}
24 % \usepackage{dcolumn}
25 % \usepackage{endfloat}
26
27 % import and customize urls
28 \usepackage[usenames,dvipsnames]{color}
29 \usepackage[breaklinks]{hyperref}
30
31 \hypersetup{colorlinks=true, linkcolor=Black, citecolor=Black, filecolor=Blue,
32     urlcolor=Blue, unicode=true}
33
34 % add bibliographic stuff 
35 % \usepackage[round]{natbib}
36 % \def\citepos#1{\citeauthor{#1}'s (\citeyear{#1})}
37 % \def\citespos#1{\citeauthor{#1}' (\citeyear{#1})}
38
39 % import vc stuff after running `make vc`: \input{vc} \pagestyle{kjhgit}
40
41 \begin{document}
42
43 \setlength{\parskip}{4.5pt}
44
45 \baselineskip 14.5pt
46
47 \title{Research Statement}
48 \author{Benjamin Mako Hill}
49
50 \maketitle
51
52 I study collective action in online communities and seek to understand
53 why some attempts at collaborative production -- like Wikipedia and
54 Linux -- build large volunteer communities while the vast majority
55 never attract even a second contributor. I am particularly interested
56 in how the design of communication and information technologies shape
57 fundemental social outcomes with broad theoretical and practical
58 implications -- like the decision to join a community or contribute to
59 a public good. My research is deeply interdisciplinary, consists
60 primarily of ``big data'' quantitative analyses, and lies at the
61 intersection of sociology, communication, and human-computer
62 interaction.
63
64 Using Internet-based peer production projects as my research settings,
65 my work seeks to understand the conditions for collective action using
66 observational data from real communities.  This work has been shaped
67 by three complentary approaches: (1) the comparison of failures to
68 build communities to rare successful attempts through the use of
69 projects as the unit of analysis; (2) attention to the role of
70 reputation and status in the mobilization of volunteers; and (3)
71 analysis of design changes as ``natural experiments'' building a
72 deeper, and often causal, understanding of social processes using
73 observational data. Nearly all of my work incorporates at least two of
74 these approaches.
75
76 \section{Projects As Unit of Analysis}
77
78 Although there have been many thousands of studies of online
79 collective action the vast majority have only considered successful
80 projects like Wikipedia and Linux.  The majority of research on
81 collective action -- on and offline -- has only considered projects
82 that have successfully mobilized. In this sense, most previous
83 analyses of collection action have systematically selected on their
84 dependent variable. Most of my research treats projects as the unit of
85 analysis and collective action as the outcome of interest.
86
87 % \begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0.4\textwidth}
88 %  \begin{centering}
89 %  \includegraphics[width=2.4in]{figures/wp_citations_by_year.png}
90 %  \caption{Number of published academic articles with ``wikipedia''
91 %  in title by year.}
92 %  \label{fig:wppapers}
93 %  \end{centering}
94 %\end{wrapfigure}
95
96 \begin{wrapfigure}{r}{2.6in}
97  \begin{centering}
98  \includegraphics[width=2.6in]{figures/scratch_screenshot_default.png}
99  \caption{A screenshot of the Scratch programming environment
100    where users create animations and interactive games.}
101  \label{fig:scratchapp}
102  \end{centering}
103  \vspace{-2em}
104 \end{wrapfigure}
105
106 In one study, I compare Wikipedia to seven attempts to create online
107 collaborative encyclopedia projects that were launched previously
108 \cite{hill_almost_2012}. Using an inductive, grounded-theory based
109 analysis of founder interviews and archival data, I propose four
110 hypothesis to explain why Wikipedia attracted many more
111 contributors. Although the paper's methods diverge from the
112 quantitative, ``big data'' approach typical of most of my work, the
113 research question and strategy is representative.
114
115 I have also followed this strategy in a series of quantitative
116 studies of the Scratch online community: a public website where a large
117 community of users create, share, and remix interactive media. The
118 community is built around the Scratch programming environment: a
119 freely downloadable desktop application that allows amateur creators
120 to combine media with programming code (see Figure
121 \ref{fig:scratchapp}). Despite the fact that Scratch is a community
122 designed to promote collaboration through content remixing, only about
123 ten percent of Scratch projects attract a second
124 contributor.
125
126 In one study, co-authored with Andrés Monroy-Hernández and forthcoming
127 in American Behavioral Scientist, I test several of the most widely
128 cited theories associated with ``generativity'' (i.e., qualities of
129 technology or content that make some works more fertile ground for
130 collaboration). I find some support for existing theory but also find
131 that, across the board, factors associated with more collaboration are
132 also associated with less original and transformative types of
133 joint-work \cite{hill_remixing_2012}. In another study of Scratch
134 written with Monroy-Hernández and Kristina Olson, I show that this type
135 of superficial collaboration leads to negative reactions and community
136 displeasure \cite{hill_responses_2010}.
137
138 \begin{wrapfigure}{l}{2.6in}
139  \begin{centering}
140  \includegraphics[width=2.6in]{figures/frontpage_modified-topremix.png}
141   \caption{The front page of the Scratch online community where users
142     can share and collaborate on projects.}
143  \label{fig:scratchfrontpage}
144  \end{centering}
145  \vspace{-2em}
146 \end{wrapfigure}
147
148 This year, I am conducting a population-level analysis in a new
149 dataset I have created that includes 80,000 attempts at wikis (i.e.,
150 public, editable, websites similar to Wikipedia). In my first working
151 paper using this dataset, I consider inter-organizational effects of
152 competition for volunteer labor and find little support for a widely
153 cited ecological model of collective action from sociology that treats
154 volunteer labor as a fixed and finite resource. Instead, I show that
155 contributions to different wikis on the same topic or theme are driven
156 primarily by environment-level changes in interest and that projects
157 may even benefit from complimentarities and synergies
158 \cite{hill_is_2012}.
159
160 \section{Reputation and Status}
161
162 Although empirical research comparing successful and unsuccessful peer
163 production projects has been rare, theories have been widespread. No
164 theory has been more influential than the suggestion that, in the
165 absence of pecuniary rewards, contributions to online public goods are
166 driven by the possibility of increased reputation and status for
167 contributors.
168
169 \begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0.3\textwidth}
170  \vspace{-1em}
171  \begin{centering}
172  \includegraphics[width=1.9in]{figures/barnstar_alone.png}
173  \caption{Image of a ``barnstar'' social award given by Wikipedia
174    contributors to each other to recognize positive contributions .}
175  \label{fig:barnstar}
176  \end{centering}
177  \vspace{-1em}
178 \end{wrapfigure}
179
180 In a study of status-based awards in Wikipedia called ``barnstars''
181 (see Figure \ref{fig:barnstar}) -- a collaboration with Aaron Shaw and
182 Yochai Benkler -- I provide an empirical test of an influential
183 status-based theory of collective action from sociology. Although the
184 study finds support for the widely hypothesized ``virtuous cycle'' of
185 status rewards both causing and being caused by contributions, it also
186 finds that this effect is limited to a sub-population of Wikipedia
187 contributors -- ``signalers'' who show off their awards
188 \cite{hill_status_2012}. This result has broad implications for both
189 status-based theories of collective action as well the design of
190 reputation-based rewards.
191
192 In a mixed methods study of Scratch, written with a team at Microsoft
193 Research and nominated for best paper at the CHI 2011 conference
194 \cite{monroy-hernandez_computers_2011}, I present both a quantitative
195 analysis of a design change and in-depth interviews of users to
196 demonstrate how credit-giving is ineffective when it stems from an
197 automated system because systems fail to reinforce status-ordering
198 with credible human expressions of social deference and gratitude.
199
200 %\newpage
201 \section{Design-Driven Natural Experiments}
202
203 Although nearly all of my work has important implications for the
204 design of socio-technical systems, I have structured much of my work
205 around the evaluation of technological design changes. In several
206 papers, I treat design changes as ``natural experiments'' that
207 exogenously change the ways that social structure is enacted. By doing
208 so, I can both build causal understandings of social phenomena from
209 field data, and can tighten the distance between theory and design.
210
211 \begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0.25\textwidth}
212  \vspace{-1em}
213  \begin{centering}
214  \includegraphics[width=1.5in]{figures/lilypad.png}
215  \caption{A image of the LilyPad Arduino microcontroller.}
216  \label{fig:lilypad}
217  \end{centering}
218  \vspace{-1em}
219 \end{wrapfigure}
220
221 For example, to evaluate the impact of status-based incentives and
222 collaboration in Scratch, I use a regression discontinuity framework
223 to measure the causal effect of increased status for collaboration
224 \cite{hill_causal_2012}. I show that highlighting collaborative
225 projects on the Scratch web page (see the bottom of Figure
226 \ref{fig:scratchfrontpage}) resulted in more collaboration but also
227 caused a decrease in the amount of total effort exerted by
228 contributors. Speaking to fundamental sociological work in the
229 literature on collective action, I present evidence that this decrease
230 is driven by both an the influx of new contributors and a decrease in
231 the effort and contributions of established participants.
232
233 In other work with Leah Buechley, I have analyzed sales records of
234 hobbyist microcontrollers to argue that relatively simple design
235 changes in the \emph{LilyPad Arduino} -- a electronics toolkit
236 minimally re-designed for women and girls (see Figure
237 \ref{fig:lilypad}) -- lead to large increases in the proportion of
238 women contributors and drastic shifts in the type of projects created
239 \cite{buechley_lilypad_2010}. I have also explored how technical
240 errors may be able to provide similar opportunities for analysis
241 \cite{hill_revealing_2010}.
242
243 % or changes in socio-technical systems describing responsibility for a piece of software can lead to an important impact in the type and structure of contributions in peer production \cite{michlmayr_quality_2003}
244
245 \section{Research Agenda}
246
247 My research agenda involves further exploration of the determinants of
248 collection action online -- especially using a series of large new
249 datasets I have recently assembled. I plan to both continue on this
250 research trajectory and to create new social and technical
251 infrastructure that will allow others researchers to join me in ``big
252 data'' observational research with active communities. This section
253 outlines some future directions I plan to explore.
254
255 \emph{Understanding the Relationship Between Collective Action and
256   Performance} -- My work has treated collective action and production
257 as ends in themselves and has largely avoided the consideration of
258 issues of performance, efficiency, and quality. Using my existing
259 datasets, I plan to compare the performance of collaborative
260 production to individually produced works to understand when
261 successful collection action leads to increased performance. For
262 example, in an analysis using data from Scratch which currently under
263 review -- done in collaboration with Monroy-Hernández -- I show
264 important limitations of collaboration through remixing in regards to
265 project quality, particularly for more artistic or media-intensive
266 works \cite{hill_cost_2012}.
267
268 \emph{Integrated Theory of Design for Collective Action} -- My studies
269 of status and reputation provide a detailed understanding of the dynamics of
270 collection action in relation to one set of important predictors. In future
271 work, I plan to evaluate the effect of governance and different
272 systems of authority, framing, modularity and project complexity. In
273 the long term, I hope to offer a broad set of principles of
274 design for online collection action and community.
275
276 \emph{Toolkits for Experimental Social Design} -- My research has been
277 possible through personal relationships I have with a series of
278 organizations with large, active, online communities (e.g., the MIT
279 Media Lab and the Wikimedia Foundation). These organizations, like
280 many others, make design changes to the software that supports their
281 communities to encourage contributions and improve users'
282 experiences. Most of the time, these organizations have very little
283 idea if these changes are effective. I plan to seek funding for, and
284 to create, a technical framework and a network of academic and
285 practitioner collaborators, to facilitate well-designed natural
286 experiments by the hosts of large online communities and to share data
287 that allows for academic evaluation of these experiments.
288
289 Although I study cooperation, I also practice it. In graduate school,
290 I have collaborated with a large and engaged group of co-authors in
291 many academic departments. I intend to continue doing so. In sum, my
292 research uses design to contribute to social scientific theories of
293 collective action, and uses theories of collective action to influence
294 design. Although my research settings are online communities, I
295 believe my work has implications for a broad range of disciplines and
296 fields.
297
298 % bibliography here
299 \renewcommand{\bibsection}{\section{\bibname}\prebibhook}
300 \baselineskip 14.2pt
301 \bibliography{refs-processed}
302 \bibliographystyle{unsrt}
303
304 \end{document}
305

Benjamin Mako Hill || Want to submit a patch?